Annual AM Night on 1936 KHz. December 18


Annual AM Night on 1936 KHz. December 18

The Greater Cincinnati Amateur Radio Association’s (GCARA) 1936 Net will hold it’s annual AM night on December 18, 2014. The pre net activities begin at 6 PM ET and the official net starts at 9 PM ET. Each year, the event attracts 60 to 70 stations from around the country. Net membership is not necessary as this is an open net. Many of the stations are running heavy metal rigs converted from broadcast transmitters, military radios or classic ham rigs from the 40′s,50′s and 60′s. There are also modern SDR and Class E rigs that are heard. This is a fun event where each station gets to describe their station and get signal reports from reporting stations. Bill, NM4A from Union Kentucky will be the event host. Even if you cant’ transmit, this is a event worthy of “reading the mail”.

We hope you can join us December 18th on 1936 KHz…..Jay K8CJY and Geoff W8GNM Net Managers.

via Annual AM Night on 1936 KHz. December 18.

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Sometimes, 160 meter signals are received quite clearly on Hawaii Island, especially during the late hours of a winter evening. I don’t know if I can pick up this fascinating event with my new Elecraft K3 and a low-mounted 160 meter loop (I have an acre of forest land on my Orchidland property on Hawaii Island), but I’ll certainly give it a try.  This sounds like a former broadcaster’s dream (I was one a few years ago), having some classic Collins transmitters (my AM station used a Collins 20-E transmitter), old RCAs, and a few Western Electrics serving the cause as amateur radio transmitters. You just can’t beat the sound of some of these old “Iron Monsters” once they are adjusted properly.  Good luck to all!

For the latest Amateur Radio News and Events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Broadband-Hamnet Expands to Include Yet Another Ham Band


Broadband-Hamnet Expands to Include Yet Another Ham Band

Broadband-Hamnet is proud to announce a new firmware release, the most recent in a series of advancements that build on the Ubiquiti firmware released for the 2.4GHz and 5.8 GHz Ham bands earlier this year.

With this BBHN 3.0.0 release, Broadband-Hamnet now includes the Ubiquiti M9-series airMAX devices, giving Hams use of the 900 MHz band for mesh networking.

Among the release’s new features is the ability to easily control the spectrum utilization of the RF links.

Please visit http://www.Broadband-Hamnet.org for more information.

via Broadband-Hamnet Expands to Include Yet Another Ham Band.

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Amateur Radio operators desiring to expand their experiments with mesh networking will be able to establish a presence on the 900 MHz Ham Band with a new BBHN 3.0 release from Broadband-Hamnet.  According to Broadband-Hamnet, the expansion “includes the Ubiquiti M9-series airMAX devices, giving Hams use of the 900 MHz band for mesh networking.”

For the latest in Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

QSO Today Podcast – Ep 18 – Bob Wolbert – K6XX


QSO Today Podcast – Ep 18 – Bob Wolbert – K6XX

Bob Wolbert, K6XX, owns and operates a multiple position contest station in the coastal hills of Northern California. According to Bob, you need every dB to get contacts in your log during a contest. As the team leader for the US in the World RadioSport Team Championship 2010, he is especially qualified to speak about what it takes to be a great contest operator. As an employee of Elecraft, Bob gets to be a professional amateur radio operator “30 X 8 X 400”. Join, Eric, 4Z1UG, in his QSO Today with Bob, K6XX.

Show Notes: http://www.qsotoday.com/podcasts/k6xx

Podcast Link:http://goo.gl/0Cw2Xh

iTunes Store: http://goo.gl/CvLNmV

Stitcher: http://goo.gl/uhf1XZ

73,

Eric

4Z5UG / WA6IGR

via QSO Today Podcast – Ep 18 – Bob Wolbert – K6XX.

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Fascinating interview with Bob Wolbert (K6XX), an Elecraft employee who operates one of the top contest stations in the Amateur Radio community.  Although I’m not a devout contester, much of what Bob says about getting the most out of your equipment and antenna will apply to those of us who drop into an occasional contest or keep a schedule with a fellow amateur radio operator in a distant country.    The “QSO Today Podcast” is enjoyable and totally educational, especially for hams such as I who don’t get on the air as often as we should.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

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Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

– W2LJ’s Blog – QRP – Do More With Less. –: This could be a very good week for DX.


Sunday, November 23, 2014This could be a very good week for DX. Next weekend is the CQ WW DX contest. Traditionally, this is the week the Big Guns, as well as those traveling to a DX location, specifically for the contest, get ready.You may very well hear lots of good DX throughout this coming week, if band conditions remain as good as they have been lately.This is the time for budding QRP DXers to make hay. The pileups should not be too, too fierce before the actual contest. This is prime time, if you’re a QRPer who loves to chase DX.The actual contest itself, is also a great opportunity. However, it’s my opinion and observation that neophyte QRPers would do well to wait until the first 24 hours of the contest have passed.By the second day of the contest, the CW “speed demons” generally tire a little and slow down their speed a bit. At the beginning of the contest, there are many stations who send CW at buzz saw speeds – not so much later on.Also, on the second day, particularly towards the end, many of these monster contest stations are still looking to rack up as many points as possible. If your signal is on the weak side, it’s at this point you are most likely to find stations willing to dig your signal out. Take advantage of that.In any event, have fun! It is entirely possible for the budding QRPer  to get 1/2, if not more, of QRP DXCC done in a single weekend.72 de Larry W2LJ QRP  - When you care to send the very least.Posted by Larry Makoski at 6:07 PM Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to PinterestLabels: contesting, DX, DXCC, Operating. DX

via – W2LJ’s Blog – QRP – Do More With Less. –: This could be a very good week for DX..

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Some excellent advice for the new QRP operator from Larry Makoski (W2LJ).  Larry suggests waiting for the first 24 of  a contest (in this case, the upcoming CQ WW DX Contest) to pass before you wade in.  Larry believes this is a good strategy, because “many of these monster contest stations are still looking to rack up as many points as possible.”  Such stations may be willing to give your low-power signal a chance to be heard.  If propagation holds out for the rest of the week, a QRP station could collect many contacts on the way to the DXCC Award.  With low-power stations, patience is a virture.

For the latest Amateur Radio News and Events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Solar flares may head to Earth


Solar flares may head to Earth.

 

First Alert Meteorologist Allyson Raye interviews Dr. Alex Young about increased solar activity.  Young’s concern is with today’s technology that is more susceptible to damage from M- and X-class flares than was the equipment of the past.  A repeat of the 1859 “Carrington Event” which destroyed several telegraph stations and set buildings on fire, would be catastophic in the current century.  A huge flare could “fry” delicate solid state electronics in devices ranging from communications equipment to defense systems.  A series of X-class flares could render ATMs, switching systems, and even power plants inoperative.  Thankfully, NASA will soon orbit a MMS satellite which will give us some advanced warning of an impending CME or solar flare.  Is your amateur radio station protected from such an event?  My old Drake TR-4 transceiver still works.  I’m uncertain whether my Elecraft K3 would survive such an event.  At any rate, I disconnect all radio equipment and antennas when they aren’t in use.  Perhaps this step will save some of my radios.  It’s time to build a Faraday Cage.

Click on the link to get the full story.  You can also enter this title in your browser:  Solar Flares May Head To Earth.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

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Thanks for visiting us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Japanese space probe, observatory record huge sunspot activity – AJW by The Asahi Shimbun


THE ASAHI SHIMBUN

Images of a sunspot cluster 66 times the size of Earth were released by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on Nov. 19.

The solar observation probe Hinode and NAOJ took pictures of the sunspots from Oct. 16 to Oct. 30, before the sun’s rotation obstructed the view. The sunspot cluster could be seen again on Nov. 15, but it had shrunk to one-third of its peak size on Oct. 26.

Sunspots appear in big clusters when the sun is most active. Large solar flares, a phenomenon triggered by sunspot activity, were also observed on the surface of the sun on six occasions in October.

Solar activity intensifies and then decreases over an 11-year cycle, according to the observatory. The sun currently appears to be in one of the most active phases of that cycle, they said.

The last time such a huge sunspot appeared was in 1990. That sunspot was 74 times the size of Earth and was observed over a four-month period.

THE ASAHI SHIMBUN astronomysunNational Astronomical Observatory of JapanJAXAsunspotssolar activity

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via Japanese space probe, observatory record huge sunspot activity – AJW by The Asahi Shimbun.

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This brief announcement from the Japanese newspaper “Ashai Shinbun” should prepare us for more solar activity.  These sunspots seem capable of generating large solar flares, which could disrupt communications on Earth. Scientists are concerned about solar flares, because much of our technological infrastructure is super sensitive to solar radiation.  A “Carrington Event”, such as the one in 1859, could render much of our solid state electronics inoperable. Potential damage could be extended to medical devices, transportation vehicles, and power generation.  My Drake TR-4 still works. Do you have a backup tube rig in case your state of the art transceiver is “fried”?

For the latest in Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Amateur Radio Volunteers on Alert in Mammoth New York Snowfall’s Aftermath


Amateur Radio Volunteers on Alert in Mammoth New York Snowfall’s Aftermath

TAGS: amateur radio, ARES volunteers, Auxiliary Radio Service, Civil Emergency Service, County Emergency Operations, ham radio volunteers, national weather service, New York, radio emergency service, severe weather, skywarn nets, upstate new york

11/21/2014

Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) and Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES) volunteers are themselves still digging out from several days of unprecedented snowfall in Upstate New York. The severe weather already has been blamed for at least a dozen deaths. Western New York Section Emergency Coordinator Joe Tedesco, KC2DKP, said ARES volunteers have activated a net and are on alert in case they’re needed. SKYWARN nets have been very active over the course of this week’s two snowfall events, and Amateur Radio has been credited with reporting weather conditions to the National Weather Service. Tedesco, who is also Assistant Erie County RACES Officer and a Military Auxiliary Radio Service (MARS) member, said he lives in a direct line from Lake Eric, where most lake-effect snow bands get started.

“Although we always do see heavy snows, I have never seen anything close to the amount we saw yesterday,” Tedesco said at mid-week. His area has received some 4 feet of snow. According to Weather.com, Wales Center, New York, recorded the highest combined snowfall total from this week’s weather events, and has 85 inches of snow on the ground.

Tedesco told ARRL Headquarters that he is unaware of any communication issues as a result of the snow. He said that he and the RACES officer for Erie County are on alert, but had not been asked to activate any emergency communication resources. He said the county Emergency Operations Center is in a very hard-hit area, and travel bans are in place because of the extremely hazardous driving conditions.

As of mid-week, Lancaster ARES had a SKYWARN net up and running and taking a lot of check-ins. “They were very hard hit in Lancaster also,” Tedesco said, “and were one of the first towns to institute a state of emergency and driving ban.” Ham radio volunteers are keeping an ear on Erie County ARES/RACES repeaters. Tedesco said he was hearing of roof collapses in the town of Hamburg and elsewhere, and that EMS crews were finding it a challenge to respond to calls with so many roads and highways impassable. By and large, he said, town and county emergency services have been handling the situation.

The Erie County Sheriff’s Office was advising residents to be aware of any signs of roof collapse. “If you hear or see cracking, evacuate and call 911 immediately,” the sheriff’s alert said.

New York Gov Andrew Cuomo has declared a state of emergency for 10 counties, including Erie County, most impacted by lake-effect snow. An army of more than 1000 transportation personnel and hundreds of snowplows and other snow-removal equipment have been deployed. Some 150 National Guardsmen into the Greater Buffalo area have been ordered up to assist with recovery efforts.

Authorities now are also concerned that rising temperatures may lead to flooding as a result of melting snow.

 

via Amateur Radio Volunteers on Alert in Mammoth New York Snowfall’s Aftermath.

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Amateur radio volunteers belonging to ARES and RACES nets are standing by to render emergency communications support following heavy snowfalls in Upstate New York.  Buffalo, New York has been digging out of a 5-ft/1.52 meters snowfall and is expecting more snow over the next few days.  Coordinator Joe Tedesco (KC2DKP) says ARES volunteers “have activated a net and are on alert in case they are needed.”

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars.  These news feeds are updated daily.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

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